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Todd C. Ream

Book Reviews

War in Remembrance

Elizabeth D. Samet's “Looking for the Good War” is a worthy exploration of not only how we remember events such as the attack on Pearl Harbor but also whether we do so well. The ways we make subsequent decisions, and the lives in the balance,…
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December 5, 2021
Articles & Essays

Intelligent by Design

Theodore Martin Hesburgh was the nation's most widely recognized Catholic priest and university president. Born in Syracuse, New York, in 1917, Hesburgh found himself unceremoniously appointed Notre Dame's president in 1952 – an office he held for 35 years.
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August 29, 2021
Book Reviews

Faith in Democracy

In the introduction and in Chapter 1, Elcott and his colleagues focus on how fear makes religious traditions such as Catholicism, Protestantism and Judaism vulnerable to being subsumed by nationalism. While adherents to those traditions may appear fervent in their conviction, part of the irony…
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June 20, 2021
Book Reviews

Religion Role Models

Christian Smith and Amy Adamczyk's new book is a note of encouragement. In essence, they contend, “parents are the most important figures shaping the religious lives and futures of their children in the United States.”
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May 2, 2021
Book Reviews

This Woman’s Work

In “Expect More! Dare to Stand Up and Stand Out,” Muffet McGraw details what it took to make those gains, as well as what is needed to bring Title IX's promise of equality to reality.
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February 14, 2021
Book Reviews

Waking Up the Echoes

Long after Saturday's cheers for old Notre Dame subside, the university's mystique will still rally the hearts of and minds of loyal sons and daughters. To individuals seeking to understand that mystique, Thomas E. Blantz and James T. Connelly's efforts prove indispensable reading.
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December 13, 2020
Book Reviews

‘I’ before ‘we…’

Defining “The Upswing” is what Putnam and Garrett refer to as “the I-we-I curve.” In essence, they mined the depths of existing data to determine how the sense of community shared by Americans has changed over time. The result is the I-we-I curve, which “traces…
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November 1, 2020
Book Reviews

A Welcome Move from SAT, But to What?

Harvard University professor Michael J. Sandel would likely argue nothing was lost when COVID-19 compelled his employer, along with other colleges and universities, to announce the SAT would be an optional component of admissions this fall. In his latest book, Sandel convincingly questions merit or…
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September 13, 2020